Tag Archives: Writing and Editing

Weekly writing check-in: polar vortex and editing

The only way to deal with the polar vortex

Oh, it was cold here this week. I think it got down to -29, without the windchill. And, yes, the only way to handle the polar vortex is to bundle up and nap.

In writing news this week, I have the edits back for The Trouble with Necromancers. So I’m switching gears to work on that because the changes I make in the first book will naturally spill into the second.

The changes I need to make? Ahem. I need to make sure the story in my head is actually on the page. To solve this issue, I asked myself: What if Poppy (the main character) knew something about the antagonist from the very start of the story?

The single question opened up not only this novel but the entire series. I’m so excited to dig in and make those changes. In related news, I now have a post-it note next to my computer that says:

Stop being sneaky.

Here’s the thing about getting an edit. You don’t necessarily need to take the editor’s suggestions (although you may want to). You do need to look at the issues and address them in some way. Maybe that way is not to delete or change but amplify. A good edit helps you see your blind spots.

In audio news, I think I’m a step closer to securing the narrator I want for Coffee & Ghosts. More on that when it’s official.

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Filed under Coffee & Ghosts, Weekly Writing Check In, Writing

Of typos and doe’s snot

The other day, this landed in my inbox:

Win Cash and Prizes with you best writing!

The best part? It came from Writer’s Digest.

I really think the fine folks at Writer’s Digest should use this to their advantage with a funny, follow-up email about how a typo isn’t the end of the world (or even your chances in a contest), but that proofreading can help.

Still, my personal best for typos is the time I wrote:

It’s doe’s snot.

I wrote this particular phrase in a software installation manual. Our software does many things, but it doesn’t need doe’s snot to do them.

The best part? A straight-faced software engineer placed the marked up hardcopy guide on my desk without a word.

So while I don’t want to read novels riddled with typographical errors, I try to keep perspective (especially for blog posts and email).

Typos, like doe’s snot, sometimes happen.

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Filed under Tech Writing, Writing